Home Rehabilitation Repairing Homes Makes these homes livable again

Repairing Homes in critical need of help

October 6, 2022

Home Rehabilitation Repairing Homes Makes these homes livable again

Repairing Homes in critical need of help

October 6, 2022

In rural Jefferson, Cocke, Grainger, and Hamblin counties in northeastern Appalachian Tennessee, our longtime partner there, Appalachian Ministries (AMOS) operates a home rehab program for the elderly, disabled, veterans, and other homeowners living in substandard conditions thanks to the supporters of Americans Helping Americans®.

“AMOS is the only on-going program that serves these individuals at no cost,” says executive director Jean-Ann Washam. “If AMOS did not provide home repairs to struggling families in East Tennessee at no cost, some of these families would be forced to move in with family members, go to a nursing home or become homeless.”

This season, Jean-Ann expected to be able to provide home repairs to 10 families using grant funding from Americans Helping Americans® to purchase shingles, drywall, lumber to construct handicap ramps, and other building materials to make their homes safe and livable again.

Among the beneficiaries was Barbara who lives in a double-wide manufactured home on a small piece of property nestled in the foothills of the Smoky Mountains.

“She has made her home a welcome place for her children and grandchildren,” says Jean-Ann.

“It was her small piece of paradise until a tree fell across her roof causing structural damage, tremendous water damage…and a great deal of heartache.”

Barbara’s sons attempted to help repair the roof and structure but were unable to do much more than place a large tarp over the roof.

“Though this mitigated the water, the water intrusion persisted,” reported Jean-Ann. “When she applied for assistance from AMOS, we quickly realized the need.

“With the financial assistance of Americans Helping Americans® and some skilled volunteers from Georgia we were able to restore Barbara’s small piece of paradise.”

AMOS home repair coordinator Charles Wilt noted that shortly after the new metal roof was installed it began to rain.

“Barbara asked her grandson to go and get the buckets.

“Perplexed, her grandson quipped, ‘Grandma, we don’t need the buckets. You have a new roof.’”

Jean-Ann added that all of those served through the AMOS home rehab program “are very low income and could not afford to do needed repairs on their own and several of them have disabilities that prevent them from performing repairs on their homes.

“Through the grant from Americans Helping Americans®, we were able to make their homes safer for them.

“We would not have been able to do all these repairs without the support of Americans Helping Americans®.”

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