Basic Needs

Americans are suffering with costs of everyday goods increasing. Americans Helping Americans addresses this issue by providing items often taken for granted. We distribute coats and blankets for enduring the harsh Appalachian winters. Proper footwear for students so their feet are protected and they can do the activities they want. Food boxes so that 10,000 families can supplement their nutrition needs. Also, dental kits to help the children practice correct oral hygiene.

Grants are also provided to our partners in Appalachian, local leaders and organizations that wish to help their neighbors to provide assistance for utility bills. Often times landlords evict renters for delinquent utility payments which can snowball a family into living on the streets. Americans with oxygen machines also rely on electricity to live and we make sure we can assist those people.

Coats

We help meet the needs of the families in Appalachia who cannot afford to buy coats for their families. We support our partners who help children and families get warm winter coats, mittens, scarves, and blankets.

Bare Feet

For a child growing up in poverty in Appalachia, the worn-out pair of shoes they are wearing today likely came from an older sibling, or perhaps even a parent. That’s why we began our Barefeet program in which a child and their parent or guardian is taken to a shoe store by one of our partner organizations where the child is able to pick out EXACTLY what pair of shoes they want.

Food Bank Support

For many children living in poverty, having reliable meals is just a dream. Our grants stock food banks with healthier perishable items. We deliver meals to children in the summer times when school is out as well as to families without vehicles that live too far from grocery centers.

Utility Support

Not being able to pay rent or utilities can often mean eviction and homelessness. We ensure thousands of lights stay on, respiratory assisting machines operate, and children stay warm during the cold winter months. We also ensure hundreds of children get new shoes, as well as warm winter coats and winter gear.

THE CHALLENGES

Food, coats, medical appointments, personal hygiene items are easy to come by for many but many go without. Our programs provide these basic needs.

Our 2023 Impact

Received utility/rent assistance

Youth and adult coats were distributed to school students, the elderly, and the homeless

Dental kits given to children

Blankets distributed to families and homeless individuals

Individuals received medical treatment at a free clinic in Georgia

Latest Blogs/News
Announcing Veterans Supportive Housing

Announcing Veterans Supportive Housing

Americans Helping Americans® is pleased to announce the implementation of our new Veterans Housing Support (VHS) program, an innovative and person-centered program dedicated to empowering veterans experiencing homelessness and housing insecurity in Fairfax County,...

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Repairing and Rebuilding Homes, and Lives

Repairing and Rebuilding Homes, and Lives

Rebuilding Homes and Lives in the Heart of Appalachia In rural Appalachia, the arrival of spring is a spectacle of nature's revival, with early bloomers and budding trees painting the landscape in vibrant colors. Yet, beyond nature's beauty, spring marks a season of...

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Want2Work students are winning awards and landing jobs!

Want2Work students are winning awards and landing jobs!

Through the Americans Helping Americans® Want2Work initiative, our partners – the Lee County and the Estill County Area Technology Centers (ATC), both located in Kentucky, and the Lee County Career and Technical Center (CTC) in Virginia – are helping to ensure that...

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Our Gardening Programs Sprouts more than Food

Our Gardening Programs Sprouts more than Food

Throughout Appalachia, children and families go hungry every day due to food insecurity issues, primarily because their limited financial resources mean that they are faced every month with the difficult decision of whether to pay their rent, utilities, or other...

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